Hooded Warbler
Ecoregional Scale Conservation Planning
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Made possible through a partnership with the National Wetlands Research Center

Todd Jones-Farrand

Todd is currently the Science Coordinator of the Central Hardwoods Joint Venture – a private, state, and federal conservation partnership. He is responsible for coordinating and facilitating the work of that partnership on all aspects of bird conservation planning, implementation, monitoring, research, and evaluation. Todd’s focus is on strengthening the scientific foundation of the Joint Venture’s cooperative efforts to sustain bird populations.

Todd Jones-Farrand (formerly D. Todd Farrand) received a Bachelor of Arts in Biology from the University of Missouri-Columbia (MU) in 1992. After traveling in the U.S. and Europe, he returned to MU in August 1994 to pursue a graduate education. In June of 1995, he entered Southern Illinois University-Carbondale (SIUC) to study habitat modeling of reintroduced river otters. After receiving a Masters of Science in Zoology in August 1997, he traveled and worked several temporary technician positions through MU before accepting a full-time Research Associate position with the Food and Agricultural Policy Research Institute (FAPRI) in August 1998. Here he created, analyzed, and maintained Geographic Information System data for FAPRI, and modeled water quality in agricultural systems. He entered the Ph.D. program in Fisheries and Wildlife at MU in 2001 to study the effects of Farm Bill conservation programs on birds and small mammals. As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Missouri-Columbia, Todd developed spatial Habitat Suitability Index models for 40 bird species and used Forest Inventory and Analysis and National Landcover data to assess the ability of the 74-million acre Central Harwoods Bird Conservation Region to sustain priority landbird populations.


John Tirpak

John is currently the Science Coordinator of the Lower Mississippi Valley Joint Venture – a private, state, and federal conservation partnership. He is responsible for coordinating and facilitating the work of that partnership on all aspects of bird conservation planning, implementation, monitoring, research, and evaluation. John’s focus is on progressively refining the biological underpinning of the conservation partnership’s collective efforts within the Lower Mississippi Valley region to ensure they are built on the strongest scientific foundation possible.

John received a BS in Wildlife Resource Management from West Virginia University in 1996. Following graduation, John held a number of temporary field positions in West Virginia, Ohio, Louisiana, and Connecticut – mostly working on habitat associations of breeding landbirds. In 1999, John began pursuing an MS at California University of Pennsylvania. Here he began studies on the influence of habitat on ruffed grouse reproductive ecology as part of the Appalachian Cooperative Grouse Research Project. In 2001, John entered the PhD program at Fordham University, where he continued his research on ruffed grouse and built spatially explicit population models for ruffed grouse on 7 sites in 5 states throughout the Appalachian region. As a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Missouri-Columbia, John developed spatial Habitat Suitability Index models for 40 bird species and used Forest Inventory and Analysis and National Landcover data to assess the ability of the 52-million acre West Gulf Coastal Plain to sustain priority landbird populations.

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